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EthicalConsiderationsforDiscreteChoiceExperimentswithCaregivingPopulations (1).docx (33.92 kB)
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Ethical Considerations for Discrete Choice Experiments with Caregiving Populations

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posted on 25.02.2022, 23:21 authored by Judy IllesJudy Illes, Ashley LawsonAshley Lawson, Patrick McDonald

We discuss challenges experienced with a discrete choice experiment where the lack of sufficient responses to power analysis may have been due to the vulnerability of the population, added caregiving burdens imposed by the pandemic, and an imbalance of benefit-to-load of participation. We also address considerations for the paradigm where the necessarily few testable attributes may limit cultural meaningfulness and generalizability, and bring into question principles of research ethics.

Funding

Achieving ethical integration in the development of novel neurotechnologies

National Institute of Mental Health

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RF1 MH117805 01

History

Declaration of conflicts of interest

none

Corresponding author email

jilles@mail.ubc.ca

Lead author country

Canada

Lead author job role

Higher Education Faculty 4-yr College

Lead author institution

University of British Columbia

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What are ethical considerations in research? Ethical considerations in research are a set of principles that guide your research designs and practices. These principles include voluntary participation, informed consent, anonymity, confidentiality, potential for harm, and results communication. Read More

What are ethical considerations in research? Ethical considerations in research are a set of principles that guide your research designs and practices. These principles include voluntary participation, informed consent, anonymity, confidentiality, potential for harm, and results communication. Read More